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89 Best Protein Foods, Including Plant Based Sources (2022)

Did you know that sleep & nutrition are the 2 most important factors to consider when trying to lead a healthy lifestyle!?

In this post, we will talk about nutrition with a focus on protein foods.

Because we have so many clients that struggle to consume enough protein on a daily basis, I have created this protein foods list that also includes plant-based sources of protein, complete with their macronutrient profiles.

All the animal-based sources of protein foods are broken down into categories based on their fat content per ounce.

What are some protein foods you can add to your diet?

Animal Based Sources of Protein; Lean ( 0-2 grams of fat/ounce)

*Macros based on 4oz servings unless otherwise noted


bison steaks

1. Bison – (4oz ) Lean cuts of bison are considered a high-protein food and include many nutrients like iron and zinc.

  • Fat: 4g
  • Saturated: 2g
  • Cholesterol: 55mg
  • Protein: 24g
bone broth

2. Bone Broth – (4oz) bone broth is made by simmering the bones and connective tissue of animals. This highly nutritious stock is used in soups, sauces, and gravies.

  • Fat: .1g
  • Saturated: 0g
  • Cholesterol: 1.3mg
  • Protein: 4.7g
Canadian bacon

3. Canadian Bacon – (4 slices or 56g) Canadian bacon is typically cut from the loin vs. the belly of the pig. As such, it’s much leaner than belly bacon and comes in rounded slices rather than strips.

  • Fat: 1.5g
  • Saturated: .6g
  • Cholesterol: 36.8g
  • Protein: 15.6g
chicken breast

4. Chicken Breast – (4oz) The skinless chicken breast is a lean cut of meat taken from the pec muscle on the bottom of the chicken. It is very versatile, and is often used in a variety of recipes. Check this recipe out!

  • Fat: 3g
  • Saturated: 1g
  • Cholesterol: 85g
  • Protein: 31g
egg white

5. Egg White – (33g) Egg whites are an excellent way to add protein to your diet without adding calories.

  • Fat: 0g
  • Saturated: 0g
  • Cholesterol: 0g
  • Protein: 3g
ground turkey

6. Ground Turkey – ( 4oz raw) Don’t eat red meat? Try ground turkey instead. It’s a great alternative to lean beef.

  • Fat: 9g
  • Saturated: 2.2g
  • Cholesterol: 76mg
  • Protein: 22g
pork tenderloin

7. Pork Tenderloin – (4oz) Pork tenderloin, also called pork fillet, pork steak, or Gentleman’s Cut, is a long thin cut of pork.

  • Fat: 9.9g
  • Saturated: 3.3g
  • Cholesterol: 107g
  • Protein: 33g
turkey jerky

8. Turkey Jerky – (1oz) Turkey Jerky is a great protein snack option! Easily packed for on the go, it packs a punch on the protein dial.

  • Fat: 0
  • Sat Fat: 0
  • Carbs: 5g
  • Protein 13g
venison

9. Venison – (4oz) Venison originally meant the meat of a game animal but now refers primarily to the meat of horned ungulates such as elk or deer.

  • Fat: 3.6g
  • Saturated: 1.5g
  • Cholesterol: 127g
  • Protein: 37g
Veal

10. Veal – (4oz) – In addition to being high in protien, veal is a good sournce of nutrients, including vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, niacin, riboflavin, zinc, selenium, and choline.

  • Fat: 15g
  • Saturated Fat: 5.8g
  • Carbs: 0
  • Protein: 21g
catfish

11. Catfish – (4oz cooked) – Catfish is an excellent source of vitamin B12. One serving contains 2.36 mcg, which comprises nearly all of the adult daily recommendation of 2.4 mcg.

  • Fat: 8.5g
  • Saturated Fat: 1.9g
  • Carbs: 0
  • Protein: 22g
calamari

12. Calamari – (4oz) Calamari is unlike any other seafood, with thin, tough flesh that can be transformed into tender meat if cooked well.

  • Fat: 1.7g
  • Saturated Fat: .5g
  • Carbohydrates: 3.4g
  • Protein: 18g

13. Clam – (4oz) – Clams can do much more than chowder. Try them in multiple clam recipes, ranging from soups to curries to dips and pasta.

  • Fat: 1.1g
  • Saturated Fat: .2g
  • Carbohydrates: 4.1g
  • Protein 17g
crab protein foods

14. Crab – (4oz) Crab is considered a delicacy, with a strong flavor people either like or dislike.

  • Fat: 8.3g
  • Saturated Fat: 2.1g
  • Carbohydrates: 3.6g
  • Protein: 16g
flounder protein foods

15. Flounder – (4oz) Flaky, delicately sweet flounder is a quick and easy fish to cook for weeknight dinners.

  • Fat: 2.2g
  • Saturated Fat: .5g
  • Carbs: 0
  • Protein: 14g
asparagus

16. Haddock – (4oz) Haddock is a firm white fish, slightly sweeter and smaller than cod but otherwise very similar. Both smoked and unsmoked varieties are equally popular.

  • Fat: .5g
  • Saturated Fat: .1g
  • Carbs: 0
  • Protein: 19g
haddock

17. Lobster – (4oz) Maine Lobster has a sweet flavor and is considered one of the most flavorful lobster on Earth.

  • Fat: 1g
  • Saturated Fat: .2g
  • Carbs: 0
  • Protein: 21g
lobster

18. Mahi (4oz) – Mahi Mahi, otherwise known as Dorado, is a deservedly popular fish. When done right, mahi-mahi is tender, flaky, and deliciously flavorful.

  • Fat: .8g
  • Saturated Fat: .2g
  • Carbs: 0
  • Protein: 21g
mussels

19. Mussells – (4oz) It is so easy to make steamed mussels at home. Shallots, garlic, and white wine make the perfect broth.

  • Fat: 2.5g
  • Saturated Fat: .5g
  • Carbs: 4.2g
  • Protein: 13g
salmon

20. Salmon (4oz) – Salmon is a fatty fish but a rich source of omega-3 healthy fats (EPA and DHA) and potassium. The omega-3 and -6 fatty acids combined with potassium greatly contribute to heart health.

  • Fat: 7.5g
  • Saturated Fat: 1.4g
  • Carbs: 4.2g
  • Protein: 37g
scallops

21. Scallops (4oz cooked) – Scallops are one of the simplest kinds of seafood to cook. They’re just as easy as shrimp!

  • Fat: 2.5g
  • Saturated Fat: .5g
  • Carbs: 4.2g
  • Protein: 13g
shrimp

22. Shrimp (4oz) – Aside from protein, shrimp provide a pretty impressive array of nutrients. Four ounces steamed contains over 100% of the Daily Value for selenium, over 75% for vitamin B12, over 50% for phosphorous, and over 30% for choline, copper, and iodine.

  • Fat: 3.5g
  • Saturated Fat: .5g
  • Carbs: 4.2g
  • Protein: 29g
snapper

23. Snapper (4oz) – Snapper is rich in Omega-3 fatty acids. The American Heart Association indicates that eating fish regularly may significantly decrease your risk of heart disease, atherosclerosis, and high cholesterol.

  • Fat: 4.1g
  • Saturated Fat: .8g
  • Carbs: 4.2g
  • Protein: 37g
swordfish

24. Swordfish (4oz cooked) – Swordfish is a mild-tasting, white-fleshed fish with a meaty texture. It is sold exclusively in steaks. Its mild taste makes it a good choice for those who are unsure if they like fish.

  • Fat: 12g
  • Saturated Fat: 2.8g
  • Carbs: 4.2g
  • Protein: 42g
tuna

25. Tuna (4oz) – Tuna is one of the best dietary sources of vitamin D. Just 3 ounces of canned tuna yield as much as 50% of the recommended daily level.

  • Fat: 3.1g
  • Saturated Fat: .7g
  • Carbs: 4.2g
  • Protein: 41g
whey

26. Whey Protein (1 scoop Ascent Vanilla) – Whey protein helps build lean muslce and is an exceptionally healthy way to up your food intake add more dietary protein. Make sure you are getting it from a reliable source such as Ascent which I have linked above. 

  • Fat: 1g
  • Saturated Fat:
  • Carbs: 2g
  • Protein: 25g

Animal Based Sources of Protein; Moderate Fat (3-4g of fat/per ounce)

*Macros based on listed measurements


beef jerky

27. Beef Jerky (4oz) Jack Links – In addition to being a good source of lean protein, beef jerky is rich in iron, folate, calcium and vitamins A and C.

  • Fat: 3.2g
  • Saturated Fat:
  • Carbs: 19g
  • Protein: 44g
chicken thigh

28. Chicken Thigh (4oz no skin rotisserie) – Chicken legs and thighs are an excellent source of many essential nutrients. The skin has some fat and cholesterol so leave that behind.

  • Fat: 10g
  • Saturated Fat: 2.6g
  • Carbs: 9
  • Protein: 28g
chicken sausage

29. Chicken Sausage (1link Coleman Organic) – This ground organic boneless chicken is infused with traditional Italian seasonings that tastes great!

  • Fat: 9g
  • Saturated Fat: 2.5g
  • Carbs: 1
  • Protein: 14g
whole egg

30. Whole Egg (1egg) – Eggs are a versatile food, and many people enjoy them fried, boiled, scrambled, or baked.

  • Fat: 4.8g
  • Saturated Fat: 1.6g
  • Carbs: .4g
  • Protein: 6.3g
filet of beef

31. Filet of Beef (4oz) – Filet mignon is often the most tender and lean cut. Filet mignon is easily cut with a fork and is often garnished with a sauce or wrapped with bacon.

  • Fat: 20g
  • Saturated Fat: 8g
  • Carbs: 0
  • Protein: 29g
ground sirloin

32. Ground Sirloin ( 4oz ) – Ground sirloin is ideal for recipes calling for browned, crumbled ground beef, such as chili, tacos, and spaghetti sauce. 

  • Fat: 13.3g
  • Saturated Fat: 5.3g
  • Carbs: 0g
  • Protein: 32g
quail

33. Quail (4oz) – The taste of quail is very similar to chicken; they are both ground dwellers.

  • Fat: 16g
  • Saturated Fat: 4.5g
  • Carbs: 0g
  • Protein: 28g
strip steak

34. Strip Steak (4oz) Strip steaks aren’t quite as tender as ribeyes or tenderloins, but they do offer a fantastic, bold beef flavor with fewer calories than a filet.

  • Fat: 20g
  • Saturated Fat: 7.9g
  • Carbs: 0g
  • Protein: 29.3g
oysters

35. Oysters (1 oyster) Oysters really do not have their own pronounced taste but rather acquire the taste of the dressing they are served with like lemon and butter.

  • Fat: 1.2g
  • Saturated Fat: .3g
  • Carbs: 2.5g
  • Protein: 4.7g

Animal Based Sources of Protein; High Fat (5+grams fat per/ounce)

*Macros based on measurements listed


bacon

36. Bacon (3 slices) Bacon is a type of salt-cured pork and is a processed meat. It is not considered low fat.

  • Fat: 12g
  • Saturated Fat: 4.1
  • Carbs: .6
  • Protein: 12g

37. Brat (1 link) – There are countless ways to prepare brats, but the easiest and most popular way to eat them is grilled, served with mustard and a bun.

  • Fat: 22g
  • Saturated Fat: 7.5g
  • Carbs: 2.1g
  • Protein: 10g
Rotisserie Chicken

38. Chicken Wings Rotisserie (4oz) – Have you ever tried rotisserie chickens from Costco? If not you are missing out!

  • Fat: 20g
  • Saturated Fat: 5.2g
  • Carbs: 0g
  • Protein: 27g
ground pork

39. Ground Pork (4oz) – Ground pork is usually made from pork shoulder, also known as pork butt or Boston butt, and sometimes includes trimmed ends of the loin.

  • Fat: 24g
  • Saturated Fat: 8.9g
  • Carbs: 0g
  • Protein: 19g
Rib Eye Steak

40. Rib Eye Steak (4oz) For the ultimate juicy, beefy flavor, a ribeye is a great choice. These ultra-flavorful steaks are basically individually cut prime rib roasts, and they come from the cow’s upper rib area.

  • Fat: 21.3g
  • Saturated Fat: 9.6g
  • Carbs: 0g
  • Protein: 28g

Meat Alternative Plant Based Sources of Protein

*Macros are based on cooked portions equal to 180g unless otherwise noted


Seitan

41. Seitan – Seitan is a plant-based meat alternative made from hydrated and cooked vital wheat gluten flour. It has a fairly neutral flavor that acts as a nice blank canvas for cooking. On its own, it’s most comparable to plain chicken or a portobello mushroom but absorbs any flavors and spices incredibly well.

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 9g
  • Protein: 48g
Tempeh

42. Tempeh – Tempeh is made from cooked and slightly fermented soybeans. It is high in protein, prebiotics, and a wide array of vitamins and minerals. Like tofu, tempeh takes on the flavor of what it is cooked with.

  • Fat: 19g
  • Carbs: 16g
  • Protein: 31g
Tofu

43. Tofu – Tofu is a soy based food that’s made from soy milk, curdling it and forming into a solid block. It is versatile and takes on the flavor of anything it’s cooked with. Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: 8g
  • Carbs: 4g
  • Protein: 14g
Vegan Eggs

44. Vegan Egg (2TBS) – Vegan Egg is an egg replacer made of totally plant based ingredients. A popular brand, JUST Egg cooks and tastes like eggs!

  • Fat: 1.5g
  • Carbs: 5g
  • Protein: 2g

Dairy Protein Alternatives

*Macros based on portions equal to 120ml (or 1/2 cup or 4fl oz) unless otherwise noted


Nutritional Yeast

45. Nutritional Yeast (1oz) – Nutritional yeast can help you get more protein and is often used the same way you would use grated cheese! Sprinkle it over salads, roasted veggies, pasta or rice!

  • Fat: 0g
  • Carbs: 9.5g
  • Protein: 16g
Daiya Yogurt

46. Daiya Yogurt (5.3oz) – Daiya yogurt is a greek yogurt alternative made from coconut and pea protein.

  • Fat: 4.5g
  • Carbs: 20g
  • Protein: 8g
Soy Milk

47. Soy Milk (4oz) – Soy Milk is a plant based non dairy beverage made from soybeans often consumed as an alternative to milk.

  • Fat: 1.7g
  • Carbs: 5.7g
  • Protein: 3g
Cashew Yogurt

48. Cashew Yogurt by The Daily Record (3oz) – Cashew yogurt is actually a breeze to make at home and is made from cashews, distilled water, probiotics & a tbs of vegan yogurt. Fruit can be added to give it an amazing flavor.

  • Fat: 4.5g
  • Carbs: 10g
  • Protein: 7.4g

Veggie Sources of Protein

*Macros  based on cooked portions = to 200g


asparagus

49. Asparagus – Grilled asparagus is a super quick and easy plant based protein source! Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: 0g
  • Carbs: 8g
  • Protein: 5g
broccoli

50. Broccoli – Don’t boil your broccoli into a mushy soft mess. Try this recipe!

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 14g
  • Protein: 5g
brussels sprouts

51. Brussels Sprouts – Brussels sprouts are high in fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, making them a nutritious addition to your diet. They are amazing when you add a little sriracha! This recipe is amazing!

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 14g
  • Protein: 5g
cauliflower

52. Cauliflower – Add to smoothies or use to make a pizza crust! How versatile is cauliflower!? Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 8g
  • Protein: 4g
green peas

53. Green Peas – Peas are part of the legume family! Although not my favorite – I know many people who love them.

  • Fat: 0
  • Carbs: 31g
  • Protein: 11g
kale

54. Kale – Kale chips are amazing and good for you. Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 11g
  • Protein: 4g
mushrooms

55. Mushrooms – Mushrooms are edible fungus that can provide several important nutrients. Sound gross? Check out these recipes and you may change your mind!

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 1g
  • Protein: 4g
mung bean sprouts

56. Mung Bean Sprouts – Mung beans produce an edible sprout that is crisp and described as nutty tasting. They are often used raw in salads but can be stir fried too.

  • Fat: 0
  • Carbs: 21g
  • Protein: 9g
snow peas

57. Snow Peas- Snow Peas get their name because they have the ability to withstand frost! The pod of the peas is edible and has a sweet taste.

  • Fat: 0g
  • Carbs: 16g
  • Protein: 6g
spinach

58. Spinach – This is an extremely nutrient rich vegetable that can be eaten raw, in salads or sautéed in other hot dishes.

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 8g
  • Protein:6g

Plant Based Protein Powders

*Macros are based on portions equal to 1 standard scoop or 30g


brown rice protein

59. Brown Rice Protein – Add protein to shakes, smoothies or baked goods! Brown rice can be treated with enzymes that will cause the carbohydrates to separate from the proteins which results in protein powder.

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 4g
  • Protein:25g
hemp protein

60. Hemp Protein – Hemp seeds are an excellent source of plant-based protein. They contain all nine essential amino acids, and also contain a good amount of fiber per serving.

  • Fat: 4g
  • Carbs: 7g
  • Protein:26g
peanut protein

61. Peanut Protein – Peanuts are legumes like beans and contain a high amount of fiber that also contains protein and can be used to flavor smoothies or replace the flour in baked goods!

  • Fat: 4g
  • Carbs: 8g
  • Protein:16g
pea protein

62. Pea Protein Isolate – Pea Protein is made from yellow peas and is a high quality source of protein easily digested. Here is a great recipe!

  • Fat: 2g
  • Carbs: 1g
  • Protein:25g
soy protein

63. Soy Protein Isolate – Soy foods like soy protein are often used as a whey protein alternative and can be used to replace whey in many situations.

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 2g
  • Protein 27g
spirulina powder

64. Spirulina Powder – is a blue green algae used as a nutritional supplement. It is believed to be one of the oldest life forms on Earth. It has a bitter taste but contains a protein called phycocyanin which is said to have healing effects.

  • Fat: 2g
  • Carbs: 0g
  • Protein:20g

Bean & Lugume Protein Sources

*Macros based on cooked portions equal to 70g (apx ½ cup)


chickpeas

65. Chickpeas – Chickpeas aka garbanzo beans are a rich source of vitamins, minerals, fiber and protein.

  • Fat: 2.3g
  • Carbs: 16g
  • Protein: 5.7g
lentil

66. Lentil – Cooked lentils are used to make lentil soup. Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: .4
  • Carbs: 20g
  • Protein: 9g
Edamame

67. Edamame – Edamame is young soybeans harvested before they ripen or harden. Eat the beans right out of the shell and pop them in your mouth!

  • Fat: 4g
  • Carbs: 6.9g
  • Protein: 9.2g
black bean

68. Black Beans – Black beans can be used from the can or made from scratch. Either way they are a delicious and nutritious addition to your diet!

  • Fat: 0g
  • Carbs: 20g
  • Protein: 8g
split peas

69. Split Peas – Split peas come in green or yellow varieties with the green being sweeter. Peas can be used for soup, hummus or added to any salad!

  • Fat: 0g
  • Carbs: 21g
  • Protein: 8g
kidney beans

70. Kidney Beans – These beans are synonymous with chili but they can be used in many dishes like beans and rice!

  • Fat: 0g
  • Carbs: 20g
  • Protein: 8g
pinto beans

71. Pinto Beans – Often eaten, whole, refried or mashed this bean is very versatile. Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: 0g
  • Carbs: 20g
  • Protein: 8g
navy bean

72. Navy Beans – Navy beans are a great source of fiber! Cook them yourself or buy them canned with minimal other ingredients.

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 24g
  • Protein: 7g

Nuts and Seeds Protein Sources

*Macros are based on portions equal to 20g


almonds

73. Almonds – Almonds have many health benefits and taste great too! Check out all you need to know about the almond here!

  • Fat: 10g
  • Carbs: 4g
  • Protein: 4g
cashews

74. Cashews – Cashews are native to Brazil and grow out of the base of cashew apples. Check out the history of the cashew nut here!

  • Fat: 10g
  • Carbs: 3g
  • Protein: 5g
chia seeds

75. Chia Seeds – Chia seeds are rich in omega 3’s and fiber in addition to the protein they provide.

  • Fat: 10g
  • Carbs: 3g
  • Protein: 5g
hemp seeds

76. Hemp Seeds – Hemp seeds come from the cannabis plant but do not have the same effect as marijuana! They contain very little THC – the ingredient that creates the “high” associated with marijuana.

  • Fat: 10g
  • Carbs: 1g
  • Protein: 6g
pumpkin seeds

77. Pumpkin Seeds – Save the seeds from your pumpkins every fall and bake them in the oven. Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: 9g
  • Carbs: 1g
  • Protein: 5g
peanuts

78. Peanuts – These nuts grow below the ground and are planted in early spring. They can be eaten raw, boiled or roasted. Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: 10g
  • Carbs: 3g
  • Protein: 5g
pistachios

79. Pistachios – Pistachios are a protein power house! Check out this amazing website I found about the pistachio.

  • Fat: 9g
  • Carbs: 6g
  • Protein: 4g
sunflower seeds

80. Sunflower Seeds – These are the seeds my kids spit when playing baseball.  The seeds are found in the middle of the amazingly beautiful yellow flower.

  • Fat: 10g
  • Carbs: 4g
  • Protein: 4g
flax seeds

81. Flax Seeds – these are small seeds high in fiber offering a variety of health benefits. Check out everything you need to know about the flax seed here.

  • Fat: 8g
  • Carbs: 6g
  • Protein: 4g
sesame seeds

82. Sesame Seeds – You will find these crunchy little seeds on hamburger buns and in salads! They taste great and have a plethora of health benefits. Check them out here!

  • Fat: 10g
  • Carbs: 5g
  • Protein: 4g
walnuts

83. Walnuts – Walnuts are a great source of protein and healthy Omega’s. Check out this website solely dedicated to walnuts!

  • Fat: 13g
  • Carbs: 3g
  • Protein: 3g

Grain Sources of Protein

*Macros are based on cooked portions equal to 90g unless otherwise noted


banza chickpea pasta

84. Banza Chickpea Pasta – Banza was inspired to get people to eat more chick peas and beans in general! Check out all of their products here!

  • Fat: 6g
  • Carbs: 51g
  • Protein: 22g
brown rice

85. Brown Rice – Make a large batch of brown rice to help with meal prep! Check out this easy recipe!

  • Fat: .8g
  • Carbs: 21g
  • Protein: 2.3g
couscous

86. Couscous – Couscous is made from seminola (granules of durham wheat) and is a good source of fiber. Not sure how to eat couscous? Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: 0g
  • Carbs: 18g
  • Protein: 3g
Ezekiel bread

87. Ezekial Bread – Made by Food For Life this bread is amazing. Check out everything you need to know about Ezekial Bread here!

  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbs: 15g
  • Protein: 4g
quinoa

88. Quinoa – Quinoa is pronounced KEEN-wah! Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: 2g
  • Carbs: 20g
  • Protein: 4g
wild rice

89. Wild Rice – You can use wild rice in any dish where you would put other healthy grains. Check out this recipe!

  • Fat: 0g
  • Carbs: 17g
  • Protein: 3g

What are protein foods?

Protein is an important macronutrient that provides 4 calories per 1 gram of protein. Protein foods are any foods that contain protein as their primary macronutrient.

In a nutshell protein foods:

  • Provide our bodies structure and components of enzymes
  • Regulate body function and immune system health
  • Aid in hormone regulation

Pro Tips from the R.D’s. at Healthy Steps Nutrition:

  • Choose lean sources of protein foods
  • Limit moderate and eliminate high fat sources of protein foods
  • Trim fat if needed before cooking
  • Utilize grill, bake or air fry preparation methods for easy meal prep
  • Make a meal with your protein rich foods by utilizing the plate method

Frequently Asked Questions

The answer is yes! There two “kinds” of protein. An incomplete source and a complete protein source. Amino acids are the building blocks of all protein. There are about 20 amino acids our body needs but we can only make some of them and the ones we cannot make on our own are called essential amino acids. We must get the nine essential amino acids from our diet. A complete source of protein contains all of the essential amino acids. In order for our bodies to build muscle we must have all the amino acids including the essential ones. 

Incomplete sources of protein, like some plant foods, can become a complete source by consuming a variety of incomplete proteins to make one complete source. An example of this would be eating beans and rice together. Neither contain all 9 essential amino acids, but when eaten together – they do!

The 9 essential amino acids are: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine.

Our R.D.’s always recommend a healthy diet and getting in as much of your micro and macronutrients from whole foods as possible. With that said, sometimes life gets in the way. In those situations there are some great options to choose from when looking to meet your protein needs. We recommend Ascent Protein. They have both whey and vegan options which both have all of the amino acids and are considered a complete protein.

The answer is no! Check out the sources of plant proteins above. One may struggle if they don’t cook at home and the area they live in doesn’t have many options in their eating establishments, however grocery stores have everything one needs to get in more than enough protein rich food.

Protein needs vary. If you scroll the internet you are going to find a different answer for this with every article, but in general there is a wide range of acceptable amounts from 20-30% of your calories coming from protein. The larger you are – the more protein intake you will need.

Unless you are under the consult of an RD or coach who does your body composition measurements, the best way to determine how much protein you should eat is to simply eat high protein foods with every meal. You can measure the amount of healthy protein by using the palm of your hand! Men can consider eating two palms of protein foods and women can consider eating one palm of protein foods at each meal. The ensures you are getting an adequate amount. Precision Nutrition has an amazing article linked here with an in depth study on protein consumption.

Still have questions?

If you cannot find an answer to your question in my FAQ, you can always contact me!
DM me on Instagram and I will be happy to help the best I can! Check out this blog post for some wellness products that will help you prepare your protein foods.

*Sources for the macronutrient profiles were taken from the USDA.

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I am a business owner; Live Active 563, Nutrition Business Consultant for HSN Mentoring, mom and a blogger on a mission to help the females in the world become confident, live a healthy lifestyle, accomplish great things and feel hot!